How long does a continuous glucose monitor last?





Each sensor of Freestyle libre (CGM) lasts for 14 days. After that time, you will need to replace it with a new one. You can keep buying new sensors, but you only have to buy a monitoring system once. Not all insurance providers cover CGM devices, but most do. You will need to find out from your insurance provider to what extent you can see your equipment and supplies. The monitor has a lifespan of 6 months to 2 years depends on the manufacturer.

Traditional fingerprinting does not eliminate the need to measure the blood glucose. It is still necessary to calibrate the device and confirm hypo or hyperglycemia before taking corrective action.

The (interval time) reported by various CGM devices is (debated because) the blood glucose reading is taken from the interstitial fluid and does not reflect the actual blood sugar concentration.

Who qualifies for continuous glucose monitoring?

Freestyle libre continuous glucose monitor use by adults and children with a doctor's prescription. Some models are for children up to 2 years old. Your doctor may recommend a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) if you or your child are on intensive insulin therapy, also called strict blood sugar control. But even for those familiar with the term, it is significant to know what CGM does, how to make the right choice.

Self-monitoring with a blood glucose meter (BGM) is an effective way to understand and determine glucose levels. CGM is a glucose monitoring tool that can help people who test multiple times a day to understand the additional context around their glucose changes, foods, physical activity, and the effect of medications like insulin.

The national institute of diabetes and digestive and kidney disease notes that freestyle libre cgm recommend when you are on insulin therapy. If you are unaware of body glucose level or you have hypoglycemia unawareness. If you are facing frequently high or low blood glucose levels. Your doctor may recommend you freestyle libre (CGM) if you have:

  • Significant highs and lows in your blood sugar level for no apparent reason.

  • Gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy.

  • You are on intensive insulin therapy.

  • Blood sugar levels that are too low, called hypoglycemia, or too high, called hyperglycemia.

  • You are unaware of hypoglycemia.

  • You often have high or too low blood glucose.

Visit: https://cgmmonitors.com/ for more information about Freestyle libre (continuous glucose monitoring).